Product Review – MaxATP from Max International

Product Review – MaxATP from Max International

Learn More About Coach Nicole      Get Coached by Coach Nicole     Other Products I Like

 

I was given a sample of a dietary supplement sold via network marketing called MaxATP from Max International so I gave it a try today. This is an energy supplement. I’ll be straightforward here. I’ve never used an energy drink (unless you count coffee.) I am also not a big user of dietary supplements outside of my training/racing, except for Hammer Tissue Rejuvinator and a multivitamin. But I decided to give this a try to check it out.
The claim of this product is

To provide a comprehensive solution to the energy creation, support, and protection needs of your body at the cellular level.

 

MaxATP is basically an energy shot. It is supposed to help with ATP production and also work to neutralize free radicals. ATP is adenosine triphosphate, a key component our bodies use during energy production. If you’ve heard of the Krebs Cycle in biology class, it’s involved in that. Free radicals are molecules or atoms that have an unpaired electron. These are really reactive species, which is why they are bad for us if they attack our cells. We hear a lot about antioxidants (free radicals usually involve oxygen) to keep us healthy.
So what’s in MaxATP? Per the product sheet I got, it contains a proprietary blend of:
Ribose
N-acetyl -L-carnitine
RiboCeine – Max International’s combination of Ribose and Cysteine to help produce glutathione. Read Max International’s story on glutathione here.
Panax Ginsing
Green Tea Extract
Rhodiola Rosea
Quercetin
CoQ10 (coenzyme Q10)
So really all these ingredients are common supplements, except the RiboCeine, which is proprietary to them.

 

Here are the FDA required supplement facts:

I will add that the product information contains the required disclaimer that their claims are not evaluated by the FDA, nor is the product intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 

My test: 

I just came off a week where I increased my running miles (15 miles during the week and an additional 8 miles on Saturday and a 4.7mile trail race on Sunday). My work weeks are busy as I work full time as a process engineer for a semiconductor manufacturer and do endurance sport coaching on the side, as well as preside over the local triathlon club. So I can get tired heading back to work on a Monday.

 

The supplement comes in liquid form in a 2oz bottle (1 serving).

 

I took it with breakfast at about 6:30am. I had been told it tastes like a liquid vitamin. To me it did have a vitamin flavor, but also medicine like. It would definitely be an acquired taste and I was glad I had it with my oatmeal, not after. It did not taste very good to me. But it didn’t have an aftertaste (or my oatmeal helped) so no issues there.

 

I headed into work and proceeded with my normal routine. Around 9:15 I went and got a cup of coffee (half decaf). I had a mid-morning snack of clementines, a banana and mixed nuts. Over my lunch break I went to the gym and did a 30-minute core routine and an easy 600 yard swim. I had my lunch at my desk when I returned – eggs scrambled with black beans, diced tomatoes, and pepper strips. A bit later I had greek yogurt with strawberries and raspberries.

 

How I felt. I felt pretty normal. I wasn’t fatigued, but I also didn’t feel like bouncing off the walls. I can’t say my mental focus was any different either. There may have been a slight boost in the morning, as I didn’t feel like I needed the coffee as I sometimes do. This could be because of the B-vitamins, which are common in energy supplement. I still got the coffee because I like something hot to drink in the morning. Because I workout at lunch and eat around 1:30pm, I usually don’t feel a 3:00pm fatigue, though occasionally I might, depending on my workouts and if I’ve eaten properly (enough good calories). I didn’t feel any afternoon fatigue today, but I also wasn’t “extra-energized.” Just felt normal.

 

My conclusion: For the taste and cost ($154 Retail, $124 wholesale for a 30-day supply) I’ll stick to eating a wide variety of fresh fruits, veggies, lean meats, and healthy fats to get my antioxidants. But I will add that I’ve not delved into the dietary supplement world to fully understand the bio-chemistry behind them and would like to better understand this before I recommend any supplement for consumption. I do believe some are probably good for you, especially an endurance athlete who puts a lot of extra stress on their bodies. And in my one-day test, there is no way for me to see any long-term benefits, and one can’t really “feel” antioxidants working.
But if you are interested in learning more about this supplement and others that Max International has to offer, check out this website.

 

Note: the experiences in this review are those of the author. Your experiences and opinions may differ.

 

Learn More About Coach Nicole         Get Coached by Coach Nicole                Other Products I Like

Facebook Twitter Email Plusone Linkedin
Nicole Odell

nicole@neoendurancesports.com

NO COMMENTS

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.